Software company Peercode from Geldermalsen to New York


Software developer Peercode from Geldermalsen is developing an innovative mobile app for a large American pharmaceutical company. That is why three Peercode employees traveled to New York at the end of July. The aim was to start the project with a workshop with the entire international team that will realize this project.

Peercode has been inventing and developing innovative software solutions for almost 20 years. In the the first 10 years of its existence, the focus was on the development of web applications and apps in the domain of sports and health. Examples include MyAsics.com for Asics (at that time the world's largest online running community) and services for the Fire Department (pre-employment assessment) and the Health & Safety (Preventive Health) Surveys. In recent years, however, more and more medical software projects and clients (hospitals and pharmaceutical companies) were started. For example in the field of rheumatism, asthma, lung diseases and allergies.

The app developed for the American pharmaceutical helps patients with a certain skin disease to monitor their disease activity. Patients can accurately keep track of the development of their illness through the app (for example by taking pictures) and share it with their doctor so that medication and treatment can be adapted if necessary.

Govert de Vries, director and founder of Peercode, is enthusiastic about the move to the United States: "Adherence to therapy, the actual taking of the right medication by patients, is also one of the biggest problems in the US - just like in the Netherlands. Pharmaceutical companies want their medication to have maximum impact. We can help them with this. At the same time, it is a great challenge for us to develop apps for the American market. It also involves very new issues. For example, we have to deal with new regulations."

The software developer from Geldermalsen does see many great opportunities in the medical domain. Colleague Teun Klijn: "There are more and more chronic patients. For these patients in particular, lifestyle has a major impact on their quality of life. Apps that influence behavior can be of great value. There are therefore enormous opportunities for smart software solutions for these specific patient groups."

Joachim en Teun in New York

Colleague Joachim Jansen notes that this also brings challenges. Finding good programmers is currently difficult. In that respect Peercode, according to Jansen, has been lucky with its talented team. When asked why people want to work for Peercode, Jansen answers: "They like to work in small teams, want to make an impact, want to keep learning, want to have variety and work for large organizations, but also for start-ups. Moreover, they think it's great that Peercode also develops its own software services. However, we have always opportunities for talented and motivated people who want to make an impact."